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The Oxford Handbook of Latin Palaeography

The Oxford Handbook of Latin Palaeography

Authors
Publisher Oxford University Press
Year 01/01/2021
Edition First
Pages 1072
Version hardback
Readership level Professional and scholarly
Language English
ISBN 9780195336948
Categories Palaeography (history of writing), Literary studies: classical, early & medieval, Ancient history: to c 500 CE, Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500
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Book description

Latin books are among the most numerous surviving artifacts of the Late Antique, Mediaeval, and Renaissance periods in European history; written in a variety of formats and scripts, they preserve the literary, philosophical, scientific, and religious heritage of the West. The Oxford Handbook of Latin Palaeography surveys these books, with special emphasis on the variety of scripts in which they were written. Palaeography, in the strictest sense, examines how the changing styles of script and the fluctuating shapes of individual letters allow the date and the place of production of books to be determined. More broadly conceived, palaeography examines the totality of early book production, ownership, dissemination, and use. The Oxford Handbook of Latin Palaeography includes essays on major types of script (Uncial, Insular, Beneventan, Visigothic, Gothic, etc.), describing what defines these distinct script types, and outlining when and where they were used. It expands on previous handbooks of the subject by incorporating select essays on less well-studied periods and regions, in particular late mediaeval Eastern Europe. The Oxford Handbook of Latin Palaeography is also distinguished from prior handbooks by its extensive focus on codicology and on the cultural settings and contexts of mediaeval books. Essays treat of various important features, formats, styles, and genres of mediaeval books, and of representative mediaeval libraries as intellectual centers. Additional studies explore questions of orality and the written word, the book trade, glossing and glossaries, and manuscript cataloguing. The extensive plates and figures in the volume will provide readers wtih clear illustrations of the major points, and the succinct bibliographies in each essay will direct them to more detailed works in the field.

The Oxford Handbook of Latin Palaeography

Table of contents

Forward and Acknowledgements
Introduction: Frank T. Coulson, Department of Classics, The Ohio State University

A. SCRIPT
A.1 Organizing Script
1. Punctuation: Frank T. Coulson, Department of Classics, The Ohio State University
2. Abbreviations: Olaf Pluta, Institut fur Philosophie, Ruhr-Universitat Bochum
3. Numerals: Charles Burnett, Professor of the History of Islamic Influences on Europe, Warburg Institute

A.2 Greco-Roman Heritage
4. Old Roman Cursive: Teresa De Robertis, Dipartimento di Storia,
Archeologia, Geografia, Arte, Spettacolo - Universita di Firenze (Translated from the Italian by Consuelo Dutschke)
5. New Roman Cursive: Teresa De Robertis, Dipartimento di Storia,
Archeologia, Geografia, Arte, Spettacolo - Universita di Firenze (Translated from the Italian by Consuelo Dutschke)
6. Square and Rustic Capital: David Wright, The University of California, Berkeley
7. Uncial: Robert G. Babcock, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
8. Semi-Uncial: Robert G. Babcock, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
9. Greek Scripts in Latin Manuscripts: Walter Berschin, Universitat Heidelberg

A.3 Early Medieval Hands
10. Beneventan: Francis Newton, Professor of Latin Emeritus, Duke University
11. Visigothic: Jesus Alturo i Perucho, Universitat Autonoma di Barcelona
12. Luxeuil: Paolo Cherubini, Professore ordinario, Universita degli Studi di Milano - Bicocca
13. Merovingian Gaul: David Ganz, Visiting Professor of Palaeography, The Medieval Institute, The University of Notre Dame
14. St. Gall and Alemannic: Anna A. Grotans, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, The Ohio State University
15. Insular Script: Peter Stokes, King's College, University of London

A.4 Carolingian Minuscule
16. Carolingian Minuscule in France and Germany: David Ganz, Visiting Professor of Palaeography, The Medieval Institute, The University of Notre Dame
17. Early Carolingian Minuscule in Italy: Simona Gavinelli, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Milano
18. Late Carolingian Minuscule in Italy: Mirella Ferrari, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Milano
19. Tironian Notes: David Ganz, Visiting Professor of Palaeography, The Medieval Institute, The University of Notre Dame

A.5 Gothic
20. Nomenclature of Gothic Scripts: Albert Derolez Emeritus Professor at the Free Universities of Brussels
21. French Gothic: Marie-Helene Tesniere, Conservateur general au departement des Manuscrits de La Bibliotheque nationale de France (Translated from the French by Frank T. Coulson)
22. Early English Gothic: Richard Ga

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